projectparadesend

projectparadesend:

tragicmaise:

Something my Project Parade’s End friends might find interesting…

Oh yes!

Parade’s End - war

War. Grimy, dark and disorganized. Everyone waiting and coping in their individual ways. A little too familiar, this sounds like my office:

"The curse of the army, as far as the organisation is concerned, was our imbecile national belief that the game is more than the player."

I find Chrissie’s misinterpretation of McKenzie’s name hilarious. We see the poor man’s real name only a couple of times in the first chapter, when someone else has control. Otherwise, he is McKenzie, and no more to be said about it.

Something else, I was going to comment on it in the first book too: nobody’s listening. There’s lots of misinterpretations and omissions, all good stuff for a gripping story. But FMF seems to enjoy setting up two characters, starting one into some earnest speech, and then promptly shutting off the other’s ears in favor of wandering around their own mind palace. I find this also hilarious, not sure why.

asortofbookevent
theoceanspectre:

Ford Madox Ford, No More Parades; Part I, Chapter I.
[Notes. Incredible levels of anger, and of cynicism and bitterness and nastiness, in this novel. The character of Christopher often rather irate, or agitated — in the prewar sections of the series, in civilian life, in his own head — but in No More Parades there is a new tinge to it: there is a desperation in the anger. It’s an emotion primarily aimed at the inadequacy of the organisation of the war, and so I suppose at his own helplessness.
Two insightful comments by other characters about Christopher, too, which I jotted down in my notebook. Sylvia: ‘[S]o appallingly competent, so appallingly always in the centre of his own picture…’ (which is brilliant); and General Campion, said to him: ‘You are as conceited as a hog; you are as obstinate as a bullock.’
(This is the twelfth book in my First World War-related reading series, “Goodbye to All That”.)]

theoceanspectre:

Ford Madox Ford, No More Parades; Part I, Chapter I.

[Notes. Incredible levels of anger, and of cynicism and bitterness and nastiness, in this novel. The character of Christopher often rather irate, or agitated — in the prewar sections of the series, in civilian life, in his own head — but in No More Parades there is a new tinge to it: there is a desperation in the anger. It’s an emotion primarily aimed at the inadequacy of the organisation of the war, and so I suppose at his own helplessness.

Two insightful comments by other characters about Christopher, too, which I jotted down in my notebook. Sylvia: ‘[S]o appallingly competent, so appallingly always in the centre of his own picture…’ (which is brilliant); and General Campion, said to him: ‘You are as conceited as a hog; you are as obstinate as a bullock.’

(This is the twelfth book in my First World War-related reading series, “Goodbye to All That”.)]

malapropsbookstore
You are the bubbly best friend of a guy who’s been dying to tell you how he really feels about you. He finally mustards up the courage to tell you that he’s liked since you started being friends.

You may or mayonaise not feel the same. (via castingouch)

Every time I browse the “malaprops” tag I have the urge to reblog ALL the malapropisms!  Today I give in to that urge.

(via malapropsbookstore)